Percentage of children living in low income households, by family type 2007-2011

Ministry of Education

Definitions

Children in low-income households: Percentage of children living in households with incomes below 60% of the median. Household income refers to disposable income after deducting household costs and adjusting for inflation.

Data calculation/treatment

Numerator: The number of dependent children aged under 18 years who were living in economic family units receiving an equivalent income, net of housing costs, below the low-income threshold, from the New Zealand Income Survey, by year (the two low-income thresholds used for this indicator is 60% of the 2007 median equivalent disposable family income net of housing costs adjusted for CPI, and 60% of median disposable family income net of housing costs as it changes year by year).

Denominator: The total number of dependent children aged under 18 years from the New Zealand Income Survey, by year.

Data provided by

Ministry of Education

Dataset name

Schooling: Family and Community Engagement - Children living in low-income households 2001-2011

Webpage:

http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/indicators/main/family-and-community-engagement/1991

How to find the data

At URL provided, select 'Data Tables' from the 'Downloads' section on the right-hand side.

Import & extraction details

File as imported: Schooling: Family and Community Engagement - Children living in low-income households 2001-2011

From the dataset Schooling: Family and Community Engagement - Children living in low-income households 2001-2011, this data was extracted:

  • Sheet: 2. by family type
  • Range: C3:E6
  • Provided: 12 data points

Dataset originally released on:

January 2014

Purpose of collection

Parental income has a direct impact on whether a family can afford fees, transport costs, and other significant costs that may be associated with education services. Higher income and wealth provides access to a wider range of life experiences and to resources that can support learning. Conversely, poverty is associated with a greater likelihood of poor nutrition and other health problems, housing transience, unstable parent and caregiver relationships, negative peer group influences and other factors known to impact on educational achievement.

Poverty during the early years of childhood can be particularly detrimental, with negative educational effects persisting at least into the middle years of schooling, even if family incomes improve. The relationship between income and education outcomes is not linear; increases in household income have significantly greater impacts on education outcomes for children in low-income families than outcomes for children in high-income families.