Education - Percentage of school leavers staying at school until at least their 17th birthday, by Region, 2013–2015

Ministry of Education

Data calculation/treatment

The retention data presented here is calculated from school leaver data, that is, it is the age that a school leaver completed their schooling. The Ministry convention is to consider the proportion of students that remain at school until at least their 17th birthday; this is a year after compulsory education and the average age for a student completing their upper secondary qualifications.
Ethnicity is multiple response, that is, students who affiliated in more than one ethnic group have been counted in each ethnic group. Students are only counted once in the total, therefore, the ethnic groups may not sum to the total.

Exclusions

International fee-paying students are excluded.

Data provided by

Ministry of Education

Dataset name

Know Your Region: Retention - Percentage of school leavers staying at school until at least their 17th birthday, by Region 2013–2015

Webpage:

http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/know-your-region

How to find the data

To find specific regional data, select the region of your choice, then select Retention > Trends.
The Ministry provided Figure.NZ with a raw extract of all regions in November 2016.

Import & extraction details

File as imported: Know Your Region: Retention - Percentage of school leavers staying at school until at least their 17th birthday, by Region 2013–2015

From the dataset Know Your Region: Retention - Percentage of school leavers staying at school until at least their 17th birthday, by Region 2013–2015, this data was extracted:

  • Rows: 2-439
  • Columns: 4-12
  • Provided: 3,429 data points

Purpose of collection

Completion of upper secondary education is associated with a range of economic and social benefits both in New Zealand and across the OECD. Retention to senior secondary schooling is linked to higher levels of skills and knowledge required for participation in our increasingly knowledge-based society and the wider global community.