One-parent families in New Zealand

By region, 2013 Census, number of families

Definitions

Dependent children: aged under 18 years and not employed full-time.
Family nucleus: comprises a couple with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) whose usual residence is in the same household; the children do not have partners or children of their own living in that household.

Data calculation/treatment

This table includes personal characteristics with family characteristics. It counts families.

For more information

http://archive.stats.govt.nz/Census/2013-census/info-about-the-census/data-user-guide.aspx

Exclusions

Excludes the categories 'one parent with adult child(ren) and at least one child of unknown dependency status' and 'one parent with child(ren), all dependency status unknown'.
Families with "adult children" (a 'child in a family nucleus' who is aged 15 years or over and employed full-time, or a 'child in a family nucleus' who is aged 18 years or over) are also excluded.

Data provided by

Stats NZ

Dataset name

Census: Age group and sex of sole parent, for one parent with dependent child(ren) families 2013

Webpage:

http://nzdotstat.stats.govt.nz/WBOS/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=TABLECODE8155

How to find the data

Click on Customise > Selection...
Select all items for each available variable. Then export as a CSV.

Import & extraction details

File as imported: Census: Age group and sex of sole parent, for one parent with dependent child(ren) families 2013

From the dataset Census: Age group and sex of sole parent, for one parent with dependent child(ren) families 2013, this data was extracted:

  • Rows: 2-5,941
  • Column: 5
  • Provided: 972 data points

This data forms the table Census - Sole parent families by age and sex of parent by region 2006–2013.

About this dataset

The census is the official count of how many people and dwellings there are in New Zealand. It takes a snapshot of the people in New Zealand and the places where we live.
Population information from the census helps determine how billions of dollars of government funding is spent in the community. It is used to make decisions about services such as hospitals, schools, roads, public transport, recreational facilities. Census information is used to decide electorate boundaries. It is also used by councils, community groups and businesses to plan for the future.