International Comparisons - Freshwater abstractions in OECD countries 1990–2012

OECD

Definitions

Gross water abstraction:
water removed from any source, either permanently or temporarily. Mine water and drainage water are included. Water abstractions from ground water resources in any given time period are defined as the difference between the total amount of water withdrawn from aquifers and the total amount charged artificially or injected into aquifers. Water abstractions from precipitation (e.g. rain water collected for use) is included under abstraction from surface water. The amount of water artificially charged or injected are attributed to abstractions from that water resource from which they were originally withdrawn. Water used for hydroelectricity generation is an in-situ use and is excluded.

Limitations of the data

When interpreting those data, it should be borne in mind that the definitions and estimation methods employed by Member countries may vary considerably among countries.
Please refer to the following URL for more details: http://stats.oecd.org/OECDStat_Metadata/ShowMetadata.ashx?Dataset=WATER_ABSTRACT&Lang=en

Data provided by

OECD

Dataset name

OECD Environment Statistics: Freshwater abstractions 2012

Webpage:

http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=WATER_ABSTRACT

How to find the data

Data is displayed at URL provided. To download, select 'Export', then select desired download format.

Import & extraction details

File as imported: OECD Environment Statistics: Freshwater abstractions 2012

From the dataset OECD Environment Statistics: Freshwater abstractions 2012, this data was extracted:

  • Rows: 2-8,808
  • Column: 15
  • Provided: 8,807 data points

Purpose of collection

This dataset shows the state and changes over time in the abstractions of freshwater resources in OECD countries.

Water abstractions are a major pressure on freshwater resources, particularly from public water supplies, irrigation, industrial processes and cooling of electric power plants. It has significant implications for issues of quantity and quality of water resources.